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Jules - Knitted Baby Coat.



This is such a cute pattern for a warm little baby jacket. It's knitted flat and in one piece starting from one sleeve and continuing sideways to the other. The hood is knitted last. This is such a quick little project, knitted with fairly thick yarn and big needles in garter stitch, I finished mine in only a few nights.

There is a free pattern called Lino's Coat that I was going to knit at first before noticing the improved (although not free) pattern with more sizes. Lino has only one size "+/- 9/12 months" whereas Jules has sizes ranging from 1 month to a 4 years old. I made the size for the three month olds so that my little baby can use it next autumn.



My yarn weight was heavier than in the instructions: Jules calls for worsted weight yarn, and the one I used was bulky. This is because Lino's coat suggested using bulky yarn and I succeeded not noting the change in yarn weight before I had already started. I still tried to follow the given measurements and even went down a needle size from 5.5mm to 5.0mm to stay within the gauge. That just means the baby will get an extra thick and warm jacket to brave the chilly autumn weathers with.



I made a pompom for the hood using Drops Eskimo Print in #27 rust to add to the autumn feel of the jacket. I also made brown button covers using the same Kate Davies tutorial as the last time. I don't know what yarn it is - it's something I got from my mother from her decades old stash.


Pattern: Jules by Lili Comme Tout 
Yarn: Garnstudio Drops Eskimo Tweed # 75 chili
Needles: 5.0mm

Comments

  1. what a gorgeous baby coat, I love the buttons, and the pom pom! That tweedy yarn is perfect.

    ReplyDelete

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